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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 99 (some duplicates have been removed)
no indication there was any choke holds, anything like that. there was no taser used, no baton. >> it's now being investigated by the county's top prosecutor, but the jury is already out if you go strictly by the thousand plus comments on the sheriff's office facebook page. shame on all of you. apparently the same laws don't apply to the evil and soulless authority figures. but paul, an elder at ethan's church takes a more measured approach. >> i would really like to see the investigation play out. i hope they find places that they can do better. >> paul says he was at church every sunday, sat through two services in the same seat each week and this is what that seat looked like the sunday after ethan died. >> almost always a smile on his face and i'm going to miss him. >> in frederick, kristin fisher, wusa9. >>> ethan's family declined to comment, but the family's attorney believe the deputies involved should have been suspended. after ethan's death, not a month later. he said ethan's story highlights training for law enforcement regarding individuals who are developmentally disabled.
that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: former u.s. senator chuck hagel faced a hostile reception today from half of the committee that must sign off before he can become secretary of defense. his senate confirmation hearing centered heavily on criticism from his one-time republican colleagues. the atmosphere was friendly enough at the outset as chuck hagel began his big day before the armed services committee. he quickly sought to allay concerns on both sides about his positions on everything from iran to israel to nuclear weapons. >> no one individual vote, no one individual quote, no one individual statement defines me, my beliefs, or my record. my overall world view has never changed: that america has and must mainta
nuclear device: to me is clearly a redline. >> brown: former vice presint al gore joins us to talk about his new book as well as money, politics and the future of democracy. >> the congress is virtually incapable of passing any reforms unless they first get permission from the powerful special interests. >> woodruff: do americans trust the federal government? andrew kohut says a new pew poll shows the majority do not. >> brown: and ray suarez gets the latest on the chinese hackers who allegedly mounted a four-month cyber-attack against the "new york times." that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding fothe pb newshour has been povided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers li
sure. >> police tell us beaumont is the legally registered owner of those weapons. he is officially charged with trespassing but at this time he is undergoing mental evaluations at sheppard hospital. school officials said there needs to be improvements in security. >> a loud and emotionally charged crowd converged on annapolis. 1000 gun rights activists rallied at the mall. several of them lined up to testify against the governor's gun-control legislation. david collins was in the thick of things and he joins us live from annapolis with the latest. >> the crowd was one of the largest in recent memory. so many people signed up to testify the senate committee reserve eight hours to hear from all sides. >> the right of the people to keep and bear arms. shall not be deprived. >> the police estimated the crowd of 1000 strong was allowed -- was loud and mostly charged with in your face gun rights messages. the nra organized it taking aim at governor mallees gun-control legislation being heard in committee. >> we will be the only ones to [indiscernible] because criminals do not follow laws
the u.s. embassy in turkey's capital was an "act of terror," said a white house spokesman today. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the deadly blast from a reporter on the scene in ankara. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner reports on a widening divide between israelis and palestinians after more than a decade of starts and stops in pece talks. waer: thousas ofsraeli shoppers used to drive up this road to take advantage of the bargains in the palestinian shops just ahead. the popular shopping district has become a virtual ghost town. >> brown: secretary of state hillary clinton logged nearly a million miles visiting more than 100 countries in the last four years. ray suarez examines her legacy. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a preview of sunday's big game. npr's mike pesca joins us from new orleans, site of super bowl xlvii. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newour has been proded by: >> bnsf railw
viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: for the second time in five months, a u.s. diplomatic post has been the target of a deadly assault. a suicide bomber detonated a vest with explosives outside the u.s. embassy in ankara, turkey, today, killing himself and a security guard. the white house described it as a terrorist attack. the explosion occurred around 1:15 p.m. local time. afterward, police tried to hold back the crowd gathered outside the u.s. facility in the turkish capital. debris littered the street near a side entrance where the blast took place. emergency workers wheeled one of the injured into an awaiting ambulance. u.s. ambassador to turkey francis ricciardone spoke to reporters outside the embassy. >> right now, we are all dealing with our sadness at the loss of our fellow member of our embassy. we salute his bravery, his service to turkey and to turkish-american friendship. our hearts go out to his family. >> brown: in istanbul, prime minister recep tayyip erdogan called the bombing an "attack against peace in our country." and in washington, the state department's victoria
to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the u.s. postal service announced today it plans to end saturday mail delivery beginning in august. under the plan, post offices already open on saturdays will remain so. packages will also continue to be delivered on saturdays. but home and business mail would end. the move would save an estimated $2 billion annually. the postal service ended the last budget year with a record loss, nearly $16 billion. today's decision was criticized by several members of congress who may try to overule the agency. and the head of the letter carrier's union called the move "a disastrous idea that would have a profoundly negative effect." joining us now is postmaster general patrick donohoe. and welcome to you. you spoke today being in a "very scary position financially." how scary? >> well, here's where we are right flow. now. as you mentioned we had a pretty substantial loss last year and those were accounting losses. $11.1 billion of the $15.9 is attributed to prepayment for retiree health care that we didn't pay. we defaulted. you have
moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: two major airlines announced a marriage of sorts, on this valentine's day. their combination means the field of major u.s. carriers will shrink by one. these jetliners-- sporting shiny new paint jobs-- are among the roughly 900 planes in the american airlines fleet and they're about to be joined by the 622 planes currently flying for u.s. airways. the price tag for the deal: $11 billion. creditors of american's bankrupt parent company a.m.r. will own 72% of the combined airline. the merger affects some 187 million passengers who fly the two airlines annually. >> i grew up on u.s. airways. >> brown: as well as more than 100,000 e
for joining us. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: the supreme court heard a challenge today to the landmark voting rights act from alabama officials who said a key provision has outlived its usefulness. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill on the "newshour" tonight. marcia coyle fills us in on the court arguments followed by a debate on whether the whole the law is still needed. >> brown: then, ray suarez reports on the political push to tighten gun control laws, including a ban on assault weapons. >> ifill: does it matter where we work? yahoo c.e.o. marissa mayer sparks an uproar by banning employees from working from home. >> brown: from our "coping with climate change" series, hari sreenivasan takes to the slopes and asks: could rising temperatures endanger future ski seasons? >> you don't kn if u're going to have good snow. you don't know if it's going to come early or late, or if the spring is going to become warm, and the season is going to end prematurely. we just don't have that dependability anymore. >> ifill: we have an en
." but the cash-strapped u.s. postal service will eliminate mail delivery on saturdays. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, we talk with postmaster general patrick donahoe. >> brown: then, president obama picks r.e.i. executive sally jewell to run the interior department. we look at how the cabinet is shaping up with many posts yet to fill. >> ifill: we have two stories from the middle east. margaret warner gets the latest from tunisia, the birthplace of the arab spring, where a leading opposition figure was assassinated today. >> brown: and ray suarez reports on the plight of syrian refugees who've fled to lebanon. >> at this tent camp in al-marj, in the eastern part of lebanon's bekaa valley-- only 25 miles from the syrian border-- refugees are struggling to adapt to a new, impermanent reality. >> ifill: and we close with a look at what's happening with the boy scouts, as they struggle to decide whether to lift a long-standing ban on openly gay members. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour
: a leaked document today put the spotlight back on lethal strikes by the u.s. government on u.s. citizens abroad. in response, top officials in the obama administration argued their actions are justified and legal. >> primary concern is to keep the american people safe, now do so in a way that's consistent with our laws and our values. >> ifill: attorney general eric holder today defended the justice department's rationale for authorizing the killings of americans overseas. >> we are -- we have as a basis for action that we take a congressional statute that allows us to operate against al qaeda and associated entities not only in pakistan or not only in afghanistan but in other parts of the world. we say that we only take these kinds of actions when there's an imminent threat, when capture is not feasible and when we are confident that we're doing so in a they's consistent with a federal international law. >> ifill: nbc news obtained a 16-page justice department white paper apparently prepared for congressional committees last summer that describes the obama administration's legal reasoni
explore the legal and other issues surrounding the u.s. policy. >> ifill: then, federal and state governments sue a credit ratings agency it says gave good ratings to bad rtgage investments. >> brown: ray suarez looks at president obama's use of campaign-style events to push his legislative agenda. >> ifill: hari sreenivsan examines a million-dollar match fixing scandal shaking the world of international soccer. >> brown: and playing with the enemy: we have the story of an orchestra of israelis and arabs coming together for music, and maybe more. >> the only way that we can achieve anything that is remotely related to peace is if we sit together and talk or if we at least try to. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> sailing through the heart of historic landscapes you see things differently. you get close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasures. it's a feeling that only the river can give you. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world and perhaps even yourself. viking r
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the nine justices of the u.s. supreme court pondered a central piece of civil rights legislation today. at issue: whether it's still needed, 48 years after it first became law. >> we are not there yet! >> brown: georgia congressman and civil rights leader john lewis was one of many who rallied outside the court this morning for the voting rights act. they were there on a day the justices heard a challenge to a key section of the law: it requires states with a history of discrimination-- mainly in the deep south-- to get federal approval, or pre- clearance, before changing voting procedures or districts. lewis argued the provision-- known as "section five"-- must be preserved. >> there are still forces in this country that want to take us back to another period, but we're not going back. we've come too far. we've made too much progress to go back. the literacy test may be gone; but people are using other means, other tactics and techniques. so we still need section 5 and that's why we are here today standing up fo
moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the federal government moved another day closer today to $85 billion in automatic spending cuts. and as political charges and counter-charges flew, federal reserve chief ben bernanke raised new fears about the potential economic fallout. the fed chairman told a senate committee that forcing across-the-board spending cuts could slice half a percentage point off economic growth. >> i think an appropriate balance would be to introduce these cuts more gradually and to compensate with larger and more sustained cuts in the longer run to address our long-run fiscal issues. >> ifill: bernanke said the sequester was supposed to be a doomsday weapon
>>> and that concludes this edition of "newsli." tokyo.erine kobayashi in thanks for joining us. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: federal reserve chairman ben bernanke warned lawmakers today that the automatic spending cuts set to take effect friday will hurt the economic recovery. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we examine the battle over those cuts, and how the paralysis in washington could affect hiring, investment, and more. >> ifill: then, we get the latest on the senate vote to confirm former senator chuck hagel as the next secretary of defense. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with marcia coyle about today's supreme court arguments over getting a d.n.a. sample from a suspect who was arrested but not convicted of a crime. >> ifill: special correspondent kira kay previews next week's presidential contest in kenya, where memories linger from the violence that followed the 2007 elections. >> we talk about people dead. i think if you count it over time and those who don't know it's probably aro
the hatches here, if any storms are coming. the last one ruined us totally. >> brown: and long before the worst hit, air travel was in a shambles. well over 4,000 flights were canceled through saturday, sending ripple effects across the country. the snow also halted amtrak and some mass transit service in the northeast. and for the latest on what's expected tonight and this weekend, we turn to bernie rayno, a meteorologist with accuweather. so what is the latest on the track of the storm and expected snow amounts? >> well, i will tell you, the worst of this storm we have been pointing out all week is going to be across southern new england. two storms as you mentioned, and the first storm across the midwest already producing quite a bit of snow across new york state. but the second storm as it strengthens and moves north and northeast, we're already starting to get bands of heavy snow now across new england, into toward boston, providence, hartford, snowing in new york city. and by tonight this storm is really going to start intensifying here. and anywhere in this white, new york city
" continues, with a report from miles o'brien on what science can tell us aut thminds of rampage kilrs. andy williams called me collect inside the prisop. >> i didn't think 13 people were going to get shot. i just thought i'd make a lot of noise and the cops would show up. >> ifill: francis collins, head of the national institutes of health, walks us through president obama's call for a ten-year initiative to map the human brain. >> woodruff: plus, jeffrey brown reports on an archaeological find in the orkney islands off scotland that may provide new insight into religious practices in the neolithic age. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: it was the starkest statement yet on the possible effect of automatic federal budget cuts, due to begin in nine days, on march first. defens
in connecticut that uses a checklist to evaluate and keep the best of them in the classroom. >> we have parents, students, peer and principal surveys, so the teachers are really getting a whole 360 take on what they are doing well and what they need to improve. >> ifill: the 500-year-old bones unearthed in a parking lot in england are those of king richard iii. john burns of the "new york times" fills us in. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with a master of the short story, writer george saunders. >> for me, the approach has become to go into a story not really sure what i want to say, trying to find some little seed, crystal, an interesting sentence or an image that leads to an idea, and as much as possible divest myself of any deep ideas about it. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and wit
us, those federal workers are following the story very closely. >> it's like a car payment and a utility bill. it's like a week's worth of mortgage. a lot of employees do not have a very large reserve. it's going to be a 10% pay cut. i have to lose a day. i'm going to lose a day up until the end of october. financially. you know, that is an electric bill. >> personally, my plan is to take a home equity line out on my house to pay for my children's college tuition. i had an employee who is a lower grade employee ask me if i would take her furlough day and i told her i would because she can't afford her car payment and her rent. >> there is concern, but no apparent panic among the federal workers who talked with bruce johnson. in fact, a large group of employees for the smithsonian just learned they will not be furloughed during the cuts. >> the mandatory federal budget cuts come on march 1. >> are they talking about furloughs? no information whatsoever? >> no. just that it may happen, that's it. >> many of the workers outside offices in southwest could be looking at fu
on the monster storm from bernie rayno of accuweather. >> woodruff: then, should the u.s. arm the rebels in syria? ray suarez examines a growing rift between the white house and key members of the president's cabinet. >> brown: spencer michels has the story of new discoveries about mars coming from the rover vehicle known as "curiosity," the product of nasa's jet propulsion lab. >> it may sound familiar but what scientists here at jpl are actually looking for are signs of life past and present on the red planet >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with pulitzer- prize-winning humorist dave barry about miami, the "insane city" that's the focus of his new novel. >> the people come from everywhere, people just weird people are attracted to miami. the wildlife is weird, the weather is weird, it's a festering stew of weirdness. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation cre
of "newsline." thanks for joining us. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: in the nine weeks since the schoolhouse shootings in newtown, connecticut, police around the country report hundreds more have been victims of gun violence. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. tonight begins a weeklong focus on guns here on pbs, "after newtown." on the newshour this evening, we look at political and other developments since the december tragedy and zero in on the gun debate in colorado. >> in the divisive atmosphere of the gun debate, both sides, at the federal and state level, say they know the coming months won't be easy. but they will be critical. >> ifill: then, we take up the arguments for and against the proposed construction of the keystone pipeline, as environmental activists mounted a protest this weekend. >> woodurff: ray suarez updates the hugo chavez story, after the president's surprise return to venezuela following more than two months of cancer treatment in cuba. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown talks with filmmaker kirby dick
assault in the u.s. military. >> 86% of men and women who are sexually assaulted in the military don't report. they experience reprisals that are, in many ways, a second betrayal that's even worse than the actual rape itself. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. after aurora, after virginia tech, after columbine, the question of gun violence becomes a recurring national conversation. this evening, newshour joins pbs in a week of special coverage on the topic of gun violence: "after newtown." the waves of reaction since december's connecticut school shooting continue to
before the march first deadline. for more on the sequestration and what it means for the u.s. military. i'm joined by deputy secretary of defense ashton carter. welcome, mr. secretary so let's just pick up with that comment from some republicans that this is exaggerated. >> well, for us in the defense department, unfortunately, it's not exaggerated. in fact, we don't want to take any of these steps. we certainly are trying to do it in the way that does the minimum damage to national security. we don't have a lot of flexibility, and we don't have a lot of time in that regard. sequester requires us to find $46 billion in the last half of the year, and then we have an additional problem with the lack of an appropriations bill, which is a particular problem for us. you put those two things together, and in some of accounts that fund training, for example, for army units, those accounts are 30% short over the year, and now we only have half the year in which to make up those savings. what that means is we're going to protect the wars in afghanistan-- we've got to nund them. we have to fund-- n
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 99 (some duplicates have been removed)